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5 Steps to Success with Invisalign

Posted on by Dr. Jared Gianquinto

            5 Steps to Invisalign Success

Invisalign is an awesome way to make your smile everything you want it to be. Your aligners and digital treatment plan are custom-designed for you and your teeth, and your cooperation is essential in getting the most out of your treatment. Here are some helpful guidelines that will ensure we can reach your treatment goals:

  1. Wear your aligners. Aligners will only move your teeth if they are in contact with them. Aside from eating, brushing, flossing and special occasions, you should be wearing your aligners.
  2. Wear your aligners correctly. When you put your aligners in, make sure your aligners are grabbing onto all of your attachments. We like to use the “coffee cup lid” analogy for this. If you put a plastic lid on a coffee at Starbucks and just push it on, chances are you’ll end up with a mess. Same thing with your aligners! Don’t bite them into place. Make sure to “massage” the aligners onto your attachments every time you put them on. If you have them, wear your elastics as directed.
  3. Aligner fit is more important than the dates on your packages. When you put in a new aligner, it will feel tight at first. That means your teeth are moving! After about 3-4 days, your new aligner should fit like a glove. If it doesn’t, go back to your last aligner and give us a call. If you keep going, your teeth won’t move like they’re supposed to.

 

 

 

 

  1. Always come to your regularly scheduled appointment wearing an aligner that “fits”. We try to synchronize your appointments with your aligner changes – if you need to reschedule, please make sure you don’t change your aligner right before you see us. We’ll need to see you in an aligner that you’ve been wearing for at least 7 days to keep you on track.

NOTE: The author, Dr. Jared Gianquinto, is an orthodontist in the private practice of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics in Bakersfield, CA. He was trained at Temple University and Naval Medical Center San Diego, completing orthodontic specialty training at Temple University and is past president of the Kern County Dental Society. Dr. Gianquinto’s unique combination of extensive past general/cosmetic and current specialty orthodontic practice qualify him an expert in two-phase treatment, extraction and non-extraction treatment, clear aligners (Invisalign), accelerated orthodontics and multiple bracket systems. The opinions expressed here are protected by copyright laws and can only be used with written permission from the author.

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Crozats and Crozat Treatment, Bakersfield CA

Posted on by Dr. Jared Gianquinto

Crozat Appliance. A comforable and esthetic approach?

We love it when patients have specific questions about their treatment options, and love it even more when our patients have done their homework before their consultation with us. Here at our office, we offer the latest techniques in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics based on patient comfort, clinical efficiency and scientific evidence.

I’ve recently had a few patients ask me about Crozat technique and associated appliances. If the technique and appliances are so great, why don’t we use them in our office? The short answer is that we have more comfortable and efficient methods in our modern orthodontic “bag of tricks” to do the same thing based on – you guessed it – patient comfort, clinical efficiency, and scientific evidence.  For practical reasons in younger children, an appliance that can be taken out or interferes with school, sports, music, etc will usually stay in its case, which is not exactly a recipe for success. For adults, we can do pretty much everything a Crozat did with Invisalign. And, like all removable appliances of its kind, it moves teeth by tipping them, which isn’t always favorable. For the long answer, grab a cup of coffee and keep reading. It’s a bit dry, technical and historical so you may need it! As my residency director used to say, “If you want to see what the next magical appliance is, go to the library and see what they were doing 50 years ago.” So we’ll take a trip through the history books.

Crozat appliances were part of our clinical training in orthodontics residency, along with many other historical techniques that chronicled the evolution of modern orthodontics, and never really took off in America for various reasons which we’ll get into later. Some of the underlying principles behind the Crozat appliance are still used every day, but its actual use has fallen out of favor as more efficient techniques and greater understanding of clinical effects through 3D imaging have increased the overall orthodontic knowledge base.

Another Crozat Appliance

What is a Crozat Appliance? Is it new? And what does it have to do with mid-century European Socialism?

A Crozat appliance is a removable orthodontic apparatus developed by George Crozat in the early 1900s. It was initially made entirely of precious metals, but as the field of metallurgy  progressed, less expensive and more easily obtained metals could be used. This was a major selling point in comparison to fixed appliances and braces, which could only be made with precious metals at the time. This wasn’t an issue in the US, but the use of precious metals in dentistry was banned in Nazi Germany, and German orthodontists were forced to make do with materials on hand. In short, they couldn’t make braces, but they could make a Crozat.  As a result, from 1925-1965, almost all orthodontic treatment in Europe was done with removable appliances, while in the US, treatment was done almost exclusively with fixed appliances (fully banded teeth).

Fully Banded 60’s Era Braces. Crozat Appliances are definitely “invisible” compared to these bad boys. 

Other factors in mid-century American orthodontics put removable appliances on the sidelines. First, the treatment philosophy of Edward Angle,  who emphasized precise positioning of each tooth with fixed appliances was very popular in the US. These movements were not possible with removable appliances, and for the most part, still aren’t.  Second, socialized healthcare developed a lot more quickly in Europe, which placed the emphasis on limited orthodontic treatment for large numbers of people, often delivered by general practitioners rather than orthodontic specialists.

In the mid 1960’s, orthodontic treatment in America was done primarily with fully banded braces, with limited options for removable and/or esthetic treatment. For patients who were not willing to wear fully banded braces, Crozat appliances were one of the few other ways available to straighten teeth. Like many orthodontic products today, advertising and the popular media touted the benefits of this then-revolutionary technique, which spurred a flood of inquiries to orthodontic training programs around the country. Even in its heyday, Crozat technique was popular among general dentists at the time, but not widely used by formally trained specialists in orthodontics. By and large, the results did not stack up to what could be achieved with braces. Dr. Perry Hitchcock, then Chairman of  Postgraduate Orthodontics at the University of Alabama, had fielded so many calls and letters in 1966, that he sent the following response to every inquirer, and made his form letter part of his keynote speech at the 1971 Texas State Orthodontic Society meeting.

“To Whom It May Concern:

The Crozat appliance is taught in the postgraduate Orthodontic Department of the School of Dentistry of the University of Alabama. It occupies a relative position, along with the labiolingual technique, the twin-wire technique, the edgewise technique, and now the Begg technique. The way we teach it, it is not used for every and all types of malocclusion. We are selective in its use, and our students have two years during which to become familiar with it. In our opinion, some cases do call for removal of certain teeth, and occasionally a Crozat appliance will be used to treat a case in which tooth removal is part of the treatment plan. For many conditions, we feel that other appliances will be the treatment of choice, and in the best interest of the patient.

For those conditions which are amenable to treatment by removable appliances. we feel the Crozat appliance does an excellent job in skillful and trained hands. The best potential of the Crozat appliance is realized in the hands of full-fledged, adequately trained specialists in orthodontics.

We insist on proper qualifications of orthodontists who take our three-day  advanced education course in the Crozat technique, when it is offered.

We believe it would be in the best interest of the laity if they would also inquire about the qualifications of those into whose care they entrust your children.”

The appliances and technique had some significant shortcomings, which were highlighted in the landmark article “Pitfalls of the Crozat appliance”, also written by Dr. Hitchcock and published in the November 1972 edition of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics.

Many of the purported benefits of the technique were eloquently rebutted by Dr.

Modern Clarity Advanced Braces

Hitchcock and with the exception of a handful of eccentrically dedicated practitioners scattered around the world, the Crozat technique faded into history. Was there anything wrong with the technique? Not really. Just like there’s nothing wrong with driving an original VW Beetle. It’ll get probably get you where you want to go (when it works), and some people love the idea of taking a ride in a classic car. But why drive when you can fly?

 

Here are some examples as to why the Crozat technique fell out of use in modern orthodontics:

  • Esthetics- Crozat appliances were definitely more esthetic than the fully-banded braces at the time, but do not compare to modern options such as  clear braces and Invisalign.
  • Orthopedic Effects – Like all removable appliances, is not physically capable of doing anything except tipping teeth, and early expansion to relieve crowding is of questionable benefit. And in adults, stable skeletal expansion requires either surgery or skeletal anchorage.
  • Comfort– The Crozat appliance is made of heavy wires, which are only capable of placing heavy forces on the teeth, unless they are frequently and minutely adjusted, which requires more appointments and longer treatment time than with other appliances. Heavy forces over a long period of time have been linked to root damage. Braces and Invisalign are the clear winners here.
  • Speech- Crozat appliances have no clear advantage over other removable appliances in this department. For speaking professionals, we typically recommend Invisalign.
  • Hygiene-Any orthodontic appliance can be made to facilitate oral hygiene. Again, Invisalign, with a brand new aligner every 7-10 days is the winner here.
  • Retention– Although the appliance looks simple, it has to be adjusted constantly to maintain the forces needed to move the teeth, and any kind of distortion means another visit to the dentist.

 

 

NOTE: The author, Dr. Jared Gianquinto, is an orthodontist in the private practice of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics in Bakersfield, CA. He was trained at Temple University and Naval Medical Center San Diego, completing orthodontic specialty training at Temple University and is past president of the Kern County Dental Society. Dr. Gianquinto’s unique combination of extensive past general/cosmetic and current specialty orthodontic practice qualify him an expert in two-phase treatment, extraction and non-extraction treatment, clear aligners (Invisalign), accelerated orthodontics and multiple bracket systems. The opinions expressed here are protected by copyright laws and can only be used with written permission from the author.

 

 

References:

Hitchcock, HP. Pitfalls of the Crozat Appliance, Am J Orthod. 1972 Nov;62(5):461-8.

Proffit, WR, Fields, HW, Sarver, DM. Contemporary Orthodontics, 4th edition: 396-397

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Online Account Access

Posted on by Dr. Jared Gianquinto

We are pleased to announce HIPPA-compliant secure online access to your account via our website!

Setting up access is simple:

  • Visit our website at www.orthoarts.com and click “Patient Login”
  • Click “Register Responsible Party” and enter your e-mail address
  • Your password will be emailed to you.

After your account is activated, you will have access to:

  • All patient imaging, x-rays and photos
  • Custom educational animations
  • Current account balance and payment plan information
  • Date and time of next scheduled appointment and procedure
  • Appointment history
  • Secure messaging with our office

We hope this will be a convenient service, and look forward to continually providing the best care for you and your family!

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Quarterly Drawing Winner – May 2015

Posted on by Dr. Jared Gianquinto

Thanks to everyone who participated in our quarterly drawing for 4 Hurricane Harbor tickets! Keep brushing, flossing, bringing your retainer to your appointments (if you have one), and avoiding broken brackets and wires for more chances to win! See the video below to find out who won. Next up is 6 tickets to Rush Air Sports!

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Clarity Ceramic Braces vs Invisalign. What’s the difference?

Posted on by Dr. Jared Gianquinto

Clarity Ceramic Brackets Invisalign AttachmentsThere are many people out there who would love to have straighter teeth, but are put off by the look of metal braces. Fortunately, there are treatment options that are much more esthetically pleasing for those who would rather not rock the “metal” look. When it comes to esthetic treatment, clear braces and Invisalign are the most popular choices, but is one better than the other? The answer: It depends.

Clear aligners have the advantages of being removable, and move teeth without braces and wires, which is great for many cases, and in certain situations our first choice of methods to move teeth. There are no braces to break, no wires to become “poky”, and no obstacles to regular brushing and flossing. However, there are some disadvantages that are definitely worth knowing.

First, clear aligners are removable. They only work when the patient actually wears their trays for the recommended 22 hours per day. Second, any type of clear aligner cannot transfer the same biomechanical forces to the teeth that a bracket bonded to a tooth with a wire doing the work. Third, clear aligners aren’t always more esthetic. The attachments needed to make the trays work well don’t always look better than clear braces (see above).  Fourth, clear aligners are just a tool to move teeth with, and although it may seem easier to do with a computer program doing the work, the doctor still has to know what to tell the computer in the first place to achieve the desired result. Fifth, they don’t move teeth any faster than any other system without changing the biology that makes it happen.

Invisalign and other clear aligner systems do work, and we use them extensively in our practice. However, our practice is committed to providing the best results possible. If one system can deliver a better result than another for a given case, we’ll do our best to explain the reasoning behind our recommendation, and compromises that must be accepted otherwise.

First, Invisalign is removable, which is simultaneously the greatest advantage and disadvantage. The system only moves teeth when the trays are worn for the required 22-23 hours per day. If they’re spending more time in the case than what’s needed to eat, brush and floss, chances are the teeth won’t move like they’re supposed to. This also means that the trays have to be worn with all of the attachments on the teeth and prescribed elastics to work.

Second, there are things that Invisalign doesn’t do well. Invisalign’s marketing has definitely raised awareness of esthetic orthodontic treatment options, and has empowered people to explore orthodontic treatment who may not have in a world of metal-only braces, but strategically don’t explain the limitations of the system to the public. This puts orthodontists in the less-than-ideal situation of delivering the disappointing news to prospective patients who may have their hearts set on having their teeth straightened with Invisalign. In fact, only one out of five patients that come into our office looking for Invisalign have problems that can be treated just as well as with clear braces. In the marketing world, everyone is a potential Invisalign candidate, but reality is very different. Certain treatments require some tooth movements that clear aligners can’t do very well. Achieving the best results requires extensive knowledge of biomechanics and limitations of the system to design movements that will actually work. Even with that knowledge, correcting rotations, making teeth longer, making roots parallel and closing extraction spaces are much more efficiently achieved with brackets and wires. Sometimes we use braces to achieve those movements, and then get back into Invisalign.

Third, attachments. Patients sometimes ask, “Do you need to put those bumps on my teeth?” To which we answer, “Yes, if you want your treatment to be successful.” Attachment placement and types are dictated by the type of movements the doctor asks the system to achieve. Without these attachments, movements like twisting and making teeth longer can’t happen, because smooth plastic on smooth teeth will just slide across each other without the transfer of force that makes teeth move. In certain cases, attachments with trays covering them are more noticeable than Clarity Advanced brackets and wires.

Fourth, any system used to move teeth requires an understanding in how teeth move to make it work. Since Invisalign uses a computer simulation to design the treatment plan, it appears easier to use than braces. As a result, dentists with little orthodontic training now offer to straighten their patients’ teeth. With any kind of treatment, the outcome depends more on the doctor’s training, skills and experience than the tools used to get there. Adding a computer simulation to the treatment process does not replace the need for understanding of biomechanics, diagnosis, treatment planning and management of complications. Clear aligners are just tools made of plastic. Anyone can go out and buy a custom shop guitar identical to Eric Clapton’s too. But without the artist to play it, it’s just a hunk of wood. A really cool hunk of wood, though!

Fifth, treatment time is dictate by speed and distance just like anything else. By designing efficient tooth movements, we can decrease the distance that teeth have to move to get the desired result. This is easier to do when you have computer simulations to help with the treatment planning process. However, tooth movement is a result of biological processes that just take time. The cellular turnover and biochemical pathways triggered by pressure on teeth are the same whether plastic, metal or ceramic is used to do the pushing. Accelerated orthodontics has a lot more to do with changing biology than the system used to move teeth.

We use Invisalign extensively in our office, because in certain cases it’s the best choice. For patients with mild to moderate crowding, live far away from the office (such as kids going off to college), or hygiene concerns, it works very well.

In other cases, clear braces are the better choice. Advances in materials and manufacturing processes have made clear braces work just as well as metal. Our Clarity Advanced brackets do not stain, look great with colored elastic ties (if you want to show some colors from time to time) and move teeth just as efficiently as metal braces- but they look a whole lot better!

NOTE: The author, Dr. Jared Gianquinto, is an orthodontist in the private practice of orthodontics in Bakersfield, CA. He was trained at Temple University and Naval Medical Center San Diego, completing orthodontic specialty training at Temple University. Dr. Gianquinto’s unique combination of extensive past general/cosmetic and current specialty orthodontic practice qualify him an expert in two-phase treatment, extraction and non-extraction treatment, clear aligners (Invisalign and ClearCorrect) and multiple bracket systems. The opinions expressed here are protected by copyright laws and can only be used with written permission from the author.

 

 

 

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KCDS Study Club – Recommended Photography Equipment

Posted on by Dr. Jared Gianquinto

Last week at the first meeting of the re-branded KCDS Study Club, we presented a simple, affordable digital photography setup for clinical photos, both intraoral and extraoral.

Digital Dental Photography Setup

canon-sl1a

 

Canon SL1 Digital Camera – Body only – currently $399 at Amazon.com

50mm

Canon 50mm f1.8 macro lens – currently $99 at Amazon.com

 

 

Photo Retractor

 

0118-D photo retractor – currently $23 at orthopli.com

 

photo mirror

#PM3R-9 occlusal photo mirror – currently $42 at orthopli.com

Digital Dental Photography Settings for Canon SLR with 50mm macro lens:

Extraoral: Use “portrait” setting.

Intraoral: Use “M” setting, ISO 800, f20, shutter speed 1/160.

Additional Notes: When taking the upper occlusal photo, flip the camera upside down so that the flash reflects off of the mirror and illuminates the arch.

Click here for a printer-friendly photo and case submission guide.

And remember to use Amazon Smile to donate some of the proceeds from your purchase to the CDA Foundation to help support CDA Cares, which is tentatively scheduled for Bakersfield in 2017!

Next KCDS Study Club Meeting: Wednesday, June 24, 6pm. Location TBA

 

 

NOTE: The author, Dr. Jared Gianquinto, is an orthodontist in the private practice of orthodontics in Bakersfield, CA. He was trained at Temple University and Naval Medical Center San Diego, completing orthodontic specialty training at Temple University. Dr. Gianquinto’s unique combination of extensive past general/cosmetic and current specialty orthodontic practice qualify him an expert in two-phase treatment, extraction and non-extraction treatment, clear aligners (Invisalign and ClearCorrect) and multiple bracket systems. The opinions expressed here are protected by copyright laws and can only be used with written permission from the author.

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What is the Difference between an Orthodontist and a Dentist that does Orthodontics?

Posted on by Dr. Jared Gianquinto

What is the Difference between an Orthodontist and a Dentist that does Orthodontics?

I get this question all of the time. In fact, I’ve been hearing it more and more lately, which is a good thing! It means that patients are becoming more educated about their treatment options, wary of advertising, and more inquisitive as a result.

Sometimes it can be difficult to tell if your dentist is an actual specialist, since many dentists perform orthodontic procedures with Invisalign or braces. As a matter of fact, I did quite a bit of orthodontic treatment during my four years as a general dentist both in the military and private practice before going back to school to become an orthodontist. As with any of the specialty procedures I provided back then, I would ask myself, “Can I perform this treatment as well as a specialist?” There were some instances where I could confidently say with the training I received in dental school and my first Advanced Education in General Dentistry residency that my simple extractions, root canals, minor gum surgeries, single-tooth implants and limited orthodontic treatments were done just as well as the respective oral surgeons, endodontists, periodontists and orthodontists who trained me. When it came to anything more complicated, such as extraction of impacted 3rd molars, molar root canals, major gum surgeries, multiple implants and comprehensive or interceptive orthodontic treatment, I made sure my patients were taken care of by specialists with the training and experience to deliver the best results possible. During the last few months of orthodontic residency at Temple University, every resident, along with their supervising faculty member was required to present the results of every case to world-renowned orthodontists, who would decide if either graduation or additional training were in order. While going through my competency review, I revisited the cases I had treated in general practice as well. The patients had been satisfied with the treatment results at the time, but as a newly-minted specialist, I knew the work could have been done better.

Prospective patients often ask, “Why should I have an orthodontist straighten my teeth if my general dentist says he or she can do it?” General dentists receive some training in orthodontics in dental school, just as they are in performing procedures that fall under all other specialties. Since orthodontic procedures aren’t tested on any board exam for licensing to practice dentistry, and aren’t required to be performed on patients for ADA accreditation, dental schools don’t spend nearly as much time training dental students to perform orthodontic treatment as they do in endodontics, prosthodontics, periodontics and oral surgery.

Many general dentists attend weekend courses to build on their dental school education, which is very different from the two to three years of full-time formal training in a university environment that specialists must complete before being able to limit their practice solely to their specialty. During the roughly 5,000 clinical hours of training a specialist receives, full-length treatments are taken to completion under the supervision of highly experienced faculty who teach residents how to diagnose and treat all kinds of malocclusions, as well as manage complications on the rare occasions that they occur. On the other hand, weekend courses in orthodontics sometimes provide a certification in as little as 2 days with no actual hands-on training, and no help from a specialists in case something doesn’t go as planned.

Questions you should ask:

1. Did you attend a full-time, ADA-accredited residency program?

2. How many cases like mine have you treated? And how many cases like mine are you treating right now?

3. Have you ever had a case in aligners or braces that went wrong to the point that you had to ask an orthodontist for help?

4.  Have you or any of your family members been treated by an orthodontic specialist?

5. Are you a member of the American Association of Orthodontists? The California Dental Association? The American Dental Association?

If you’re considering orthodontic treatment, be sure to check your orthodontist’s credentials.  Specialists are very proud of the training they’ve received, and will be more than happy to tell you where they went to dental school and completed their residency. You’ll see their credentials on their website, on the wall in their office, and even their staff will be happy to tell you all about their doctor’s specialty training. They’ll even have a portfolio of completed treatment to show before and after photos of cases just like yours.

Orthodontic treatment can be a sizeable investment. Before you let anyone straighten your teeth, take the time to see a specialist who has the training and experience to make sure you’ll get the results you deserve. Consultations are free, and at the very least, you’ll know you did your homework.

NOTE: The author, Dr. Jared Gianquinto, is an orthodontist in the private practice of orthodontics in Bakersfield, CA. He was trained at Temple University and Naval Medical Center San Diego, completing orthodontic specialty training at Temple University. Dr. Gianquinto’s unique combination of extensive past general/cosmetic and current specialty orthodontic practice qualify him an expert in two-phase treatment, extraction and non-extraction treatment, clear aligners (Invisalign and ClearCorrect) and multiple bracket systems. The opinions expressed here are protected by copyright laws and can only be used with written permission from the author.

NOTE: The author, Dr. Greg Jorgensen, is a board-certified orthodontist who is in the private practice of orthodontics in Rio Rancho, New Mexico (a suburb on the Westside of Albuquerque). He was trained at BYU, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of Iowa in the United States. Dr. Jorgensen’s 25 years of specialty practice and 10,000 finished cases qualify him an expert in two-phase treatment, extraction and non-extraction therapy, functional orthodontics, clear aligners (Invisalign), and multiple bracket systems (including conventional braces, Damon and other self-ligating brackets, Suresmile, and lingual braces). This blog for informational purposes only and is designed to help consumers understand currently accepted orthodontic concepts. It is not a venue for debating alternative treatment theories. Dr. Jorgensen is licensed to diagnose and treat patients only in the state of New Mexico. He cannot diagnose cases described in comments nor can he select treatment plans for readers. Because he has over 25,000 readers each month, it is impossible for him respond to all questions. Please read all of the comments associated with each article as most of the questions he receives each week have been asked and answered previously. The opinions expressed here are protected by copyright laws and can only be used with written permission from the author. – See more at: http://www.gregjorgensen.com/blog/2015/03/what-is-the-difference-between-an-orthodontist-and-a-dentist-that-does-orthodontics/#sthash.f3s4c49l.dpuf
NOTE: The author, Dr. Greg Jorgensen, is a board-certified orthodontist who is in the private practice of orthodontics in Rio Rancho, New Mexico (a suburb on the Westside of Albuquerque). He was trained at BYU, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of Iowa in the United States. Dr. Jorgensen’s 25 years of specialty practice and 10,000 finished cases qualify him an expert in two-phase treatment, extraction and non-extraction therapy, functional orthodontics, clear aligners (Invisalign), and multiple bracket systems (including conventional braces, Damon and other self-ligating brackets, Suresmile, and lingual braces). This blog for informational purposes only and is designed to help consumers understand currently accepted orthodontic concepts. It is not a venue for debating alternative treatment theories. Dr. Jorgensen is licensed to diagnose and treat patients only in the state of New Mexico. He cannot diagnose cases described in comments nor can he select treatment plans for readers. Because he has over 25,000 readers each month, it is impossible for him respond to all questions. Please read all of the comments associated with each article as most of the questions he receives each week have been asked and answered previously. The opinions expressed here are protected by copyright laws and can only be used with written permission from the author. – See more at: http://www.gregjorgensen.com/blog/2015/03/what-is-the-difference-between-an-orthodontist-and-a-dentist-that-does-orthodontics/#sthash.f3s4c49l.dpuf
OTE: The author, Dr. Greg Jorgensen, is a board-certified orthodontist who is in the private practice of orthodontics in Rio Rancho, New Mexico (a suburb on the Westside of Albuquerque). He was trained at BYU, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of Iowa in the United States. Dr. Jorgensen’s 25 years of specialty practice and 10,000 finished cases qualify him an expert in two-phase treatment, extraction and non-extraction therapy, functional orthodontics, clear aligners (Invisalign), and multiple bracket systems (including conventional braces, Damon and other self-ligating brackets, Suresmile, and lingual braces). This blog for informational purposes only and is designed to help consumers understand currently accepted orthodontic concepts. It is not a venue for debating alternative treatment theories. Dr. Jorgensen is licensed to diagnose and treat patients only in the state of New Mexico. He cannot diagnose cases described in comments nor can he select treatment plans for readers. Because he has over 25,000 readers each month, it is impossible for him respond to all questions. Please read all of the comments associated with each article as most of the questions he receives each week have been asked and answered previously. The opinions expressed here are protected by copyright laws and can only be used with written permission from the author. – See more at: http://www.gregjorgensen.com/blog/2015/03/what-is-the-difference-between-an-orthodontist-and-a-dentist-that-does-orthodontics/#sthash.f3s4c49l.dpuf
OTE: The author, Dr. Greg Jorgensen, is a board-certified orthodontist who is in the private practice of orthodontics in Rio Rancho, New Mexico (a suburb on the Westside of Albuquerque). He was trained at BYU, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of Iowa in the United States. Dr. Jorgensen’s 25 years of specialty practice and 10,000 finished cases qualify him an expert in two-phase treatment, extraction and non-extraction therapy, functional orthodontics, clear aligners (Invisalign), and multiple bracket systems (including conventional braces, Damon and other self-ligating brackets, Suresmile, and lingual braces). This blog for informational purposes only and is designed to help consumers understand currently accepted orthodontic concepts. It is not a venue for debating alternative treatment theories. Dr. Jorgensen is licensed to diagnose and treat patients only in the state of New Mexico. He cannot diagnose cases described in comments nor can he select treatment plans for readers. Because he has over 25,000 readers each month, it is impossible for him respond to all questions. Please read all of the comments associated with each article as most of the questions he receives each week have been asked and answered previously. The opinions expressed here are protected by copyright laws and can only be used with written permission from the author. – See more at: http://www.gregjorgensen.com/blog/2015/03/what-is-the-difference-between-an-orthodontist-and-a-dentist-that-does-orthodontics/#sthash.f3s4c49l.dpuf
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Treatment of Underbites

Posted on by Dr. Jared Gianquinto

Underbite Treatment Bakersfield Orthodontist Jared R Gianquinto DMD MSClass III malocclusions, more commonly known as “underbites”, are arguably the most difficult types of conditions to treat in orthodontics, especially when a patient has a skeletal pattern that tends toward an open bite. Class III malocclusions are where the lower first molar is more anterior (or more towards the front of the mouth) than the upper first molar. In this abnormal relationship, the lower teeth and jaw project further forward than the upper teeth and jaws. There is a concave appearance in profile with a prominent chin. Class III problems are usually due to an overgrowth in the lower jaw, undergrowth of the upper jaw or a combination of the two, and are genetically inherited. Class III growth patterns are often unpredictable. Lower jaw growth can occur in adults (particularly in males) into the mid 20s. Wearing a splint-type retainer can help lessen the likelihood of relapse, but sometimes additional orthodontic and/or surgical correction in adulthood is required.  Other treatment options may also be available. If you have any questions, please call us. We are here for you!

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Three Reasons for Orthodontic Treatment as an Adult

Posted on by Dr. Jared Gianquinto

A smile is an incredible asset, and our adult patients agree that it is never too late for improvement. Orthodontic treatment at later stages in life can dramatically improve your smile, but there are other reasons to seek treatment as well!

Adult Orthodontic Treatment Bakersfield

1. Improved Esthetics

This one’s a no-brainer. Straight teeth are esthetically more pleasing than teeth that are not, and a great smile can help tremendously both professionally and personally. Studies have shown that the self-esteem boost from an improved appearance lasts much longer than the treatment. Cosmetic dentistry alone can provide esthetic improvements, but often requires additional loss of tooth structure to place veneers, and periodic replacement of restorations to keep them looking their best. Your own natural teeth were designed to last an entire lifetime, and straightening them is the most conservative method for proven long-term results.

2. Improved Function

Straight teeth work better. Teeth are also designed to have chewing forces directed upon them from certain directions, and if they are out of alignment, teeth wear down unevenly, and can sometimes fracture. Tooth positions are also important in pronunciation. Spacing and incisor position can affect “S”, “T”, “F” “V” and “Th” sounds. And if you have teeth or fillings that need to be replaced, it is much easier for your dentist to provide a good restoration that will last a long time if the teeth and bite are where they are supposed to be.

3. Health

Straight teeth are a lot easier to keep clean by brushing and flossing, which we know our dentist wants us to do twice a day. If teeth are out of alignment, it is difficult to floss correctly and remove the plaque that can accumulate near the gumline. Over time, this can lead to gingivitis, gum disease, and eventual tooth loss. Crooked and protruded teeth carry a much higher risk for trauma for active people, and are much more difficult to restore if they are damaged.

At Gianquinto OrthoArts, we witness the benefits of great smiles every day and love seeing transformations we help our patients achieve every day.

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Three Most Common Reasons to see a Pediatric Orthodontist

Posted on by Dr. Jared Gianquinto

Pediatric Orthodontist Bakersfield CA

Children are prime candidates for bite treatment from a pediatric orthodontist. In fact, abnormalities in dental alignment can be diagnosed as early as seven years old. Addressing issues promptly, especially before the end of the teen years, leads to long-term dental health.

 Fixing misaligned bites early makes sense. During the sensitive stages of adolescence, children have plenty on their mind without worrying about the state of their smile. A child’s teeth are less rigidly fused than an adult’s and more adaptable to alignment. A child will also benefit from an aligned smile for a longer period of time.

Here are the top three reasons to see a pediatric orthodontist:

 1.   Dental Health

Aligned teeth are safer for the soft tissues of the mouth, for the surrounding teeth, and for physical activities. Crooked teeth can cause wear on other teeth during chewing or damage from grinding during sleeping.

Straight teeth are also easier to access for thorough brushing and flossing. The ideal flossing motion of up through the teeth, forming C-shapes on each side of the tooth, and pulling back down is much easier with aligned teeth. Careful brushing and flossing will lead to gum health and eliminate dental diseases.

2.   Functional Alignment

The teeth chew our food and help us enunciate during speech. A child will inevitably be more comfortable in food focused social situations with easy chewing. Consider how many times you touch the back of your front teeth saying this sentence out loud. Speeches and new vocabulary are tough enough for children without pronunciation difficulties.

 3.   Confidence

Consider your child’s self-esteem. Children are at a critical stage of development making lifelong friends while developing their interests and personalities. Appearance has a big impact on a child’s confidence. A confident child will be more likely to excel in school and relationships. Pave the way for your child’s success by visiting a pediatric orthodontist.

Your children are most likely covered under your dental insurance plan with a lifetime benefit for orthodontics. Make sure the orthodontist you choose is not only in your network, but also a good fit for children. Orthodontists close to your child’s school with flexible office hours (during lunch and after school) are ideal.

Ask about your doctor’s experience treating younger patients. Patience is a virtue needed to treat children along with expressing an interest in their hobbies. Your child will be more comfortable with the orthodontist and more likely to comply with the treatment process.

Contact Gianquinto OrthoArts for a pediatric orthodontist accepting new patients now. Our experience with the younger generation leaves parents and children smiling all the time.  Don’t delay. A pediatric orthodontist visit makes sense for a child’s future success.

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